Publication Summaries

Embryonic Stem Cell-Like Population in Venous Malformation

Authors: Elysia M.S. Tan, Sam D. Siljee, Helen D. Brasch, Susana Enriquez, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Medicine (Dermatology). October 2017. Doi:10.3389/fmed.2017.00162

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmed.2017.00162/full

Vascular malformations alter arteries, veins, capillaries and lymphatic vessels. The most common of these is venous malformation, which affects about 1% of the population. These malformations are composed of anomalous veins with thin walls and are present at birth but only become apparent later in life.

The cause of this condition is not well understood although a number of possibilities have been proposed. We have identified and characterised stem cells in this condition. The paper reports that there are two populations of these cells, one being part of the lining of the blood vessels, the other outside the lining.

The further characterisation of these primitive cells is the subject of ongoing research in the hope of identifying properties that might provide the opportunity of regulating and controlling them and the consequent development of these malformations.

Embryonic Stem Cell–Like Population in Dupuytren’s Disease Expresses Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

Authors: Nicholas On, Sabrina P. Koh, Helen D. Brasch, Jonathan C. Dunne, James R. Armstrong, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Plastic Reconstructive Surgery Global Open. July 2017 Vol. 5, e1422; doi:10.1097/GOX.0000000000001422     

http://journals.lww.com/prsgo/Fulltext/2017/07000
/Embryonic_Stem_Cell_Like_Population_in_Dupuytren_s.12.aspx

Dupuytren’s disease is a chronic fibrotic condition that causes the fingers to bend over. It occurs throughout the world but is particularly prevalent in Northern Europe. Surgery is the most common form of treatment but almost 40% of the cases relapse within five years.

Previously the GMRI identified and characterised embryonic stem cells in Dupuytren’s disease and it was suggested that dysregulation of these cells led to the progression of the disease. This paper has identified the presence of four components of the renin-angiotensin system in Dupuytren’s disease tissue and has located them in the stem cells associated with the microvessels in the tissue. These findings suggest that the stem cells in Dupuytren’s disease could provide a novel method for treatment through modulation of the renin-angiotensin system.

Expression and Localisation of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Two Cancer Stem Cell Subpopulations in Moderately Differentiated Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Authors: Therese Featherston, Reginald Marsh, Bede van Schaijik, Helen D. Brasch, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Medicine. July 2017. Volume 4, Article 100  doi: 10.3389/fmed.2017.00100

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmed.2017.00100/full

 

The GMRI has previously demonstrated the putative presence of two cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulations within moderately differentiated oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (MDOTSCC), which express components of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS).

In this study we investigated the expression and localisation of the proteases cathepsins B, D, and G in relation to these CSC subpopulations within MDOTSCC.

We identified the presence of cathepsins B and D in the CSCs and cathepsin G on what are phenotypically mast cells. The identification of these suggests the presence of bypass loops for the RAS. Consistent with our other findings with respect to the control of the RAS, this represents an additional area of regulation as part of a novel therapeutic target for MDOTSCC.

Renin-angiotensin System and Cancer: A Review

Authors: Matthew J. Munro, Agadha C. Wickremesekera, Paul F. Davis, Reginald Marsh, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Integrative Cancer Science and Therapeutics. March 2017. Vol.4: doi:10.15761/ICST:1000231

http://oatext.com/Renin-angiotensin-system-and-cancer-A-review.php

There are numerous reports showing that cancer patients who are treated with medications that control the renin-angiotensin system, such as anti-hypertension drugs, have better survival from cancer and a lower risk of developing cancer.

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Expression of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Wildtype Glioblastoma

Authors: Sabrina P. Koh, Agadha C. Wickremesekera, Helen D. Brasch, Reginald Marsh, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery, May 2017. Vol.4. doi:10.3389/surg.2017.00028

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2017.00028/full

The GMRI has demonstrated the presence of cancer stem cells – considered to be the origin of cancer – in many different types of cancers including glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer. We have also shown that the cancer stem cells in glioblastoma possess the constituents of the renin-angiotensin system.

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Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Lip Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

Authors: Rachna S. Ram, Helen D. Brasch, Jonathan C. Dunne, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery June 2017. Vol.4: doi:10.3389 /fsurg. 2017.00030

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2017.00030/full

Earlier research undertaken by the team at the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute has identified and characterised cancer stem cells in tongue cancer, buccal mucosal (inner cheek) cancer, and lip cancer. The team has also shown that cancer stem cells in tongue cancer and buccal mucosal cancer express the renin-angiotensin system.

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The Identification of Three Cancer Stem Cell Subpopulations within Moderately Differentiated Lip Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Authors: Rachna Ram, Helen D. Brasch, Jonathan C. Dunne, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Otorhinolarynology – Head and Neck Surgery Surgery, Front Surg 2017; 4:

http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2017.000412

Cancers of the lip are found with relatively similar levels of incidence throughout the world. The incidence is higher in males (between 12 and 13.5 per 100,000 population) but the frequency in females is increasing. It is usually treated with surgery, radiotherapy or both.

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Cancer Stem Cell Hierarchy in Glioblastoma Multiforme

Authors: Amy Bradshaw, Agadha Wickremsekera, Swee T. Tan, Lifeng Peng, Paul F. Davis and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Neurosurgery, Front Surg 2016;3:21

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00021

This paper is a review of the current knowledge and understanding of the cause of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a type of brain cancer.

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Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma Multiforme

Authors: Amy Bradshaw, Agadha Wickremesekera, Helen D. Brasch, Alice M. Chibnall, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Neurosurgery, Front Surg 2016;3:48

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00048

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of primary brain tumour. It has a five-year survival of only 2%, despite intensive research. It frequently recurs following surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This poor prognosis has been attributed to the initiation, propagation and differentiation of cancer stem cells (CSCs).

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Glioblastoma Multiforme Cancer Stem Cells Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

Authors: Amy R. Bradshaw, Agadha C. Wickremesekera, Helen D. Brasch, Alice M. Chibnall, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Neurosurgery, Front Surg 2016;3:51

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00051

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a brain cancer that constitutes 60-70% of all malignant gliomas. This poor prognosis has been ascribed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within the GBM. These CSCs multiply and form cancer cells that make up the bulk of the tumour. The CSCs are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

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Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Authors: Ranui Baillie, Tinte Itinteang, Helen H. Yu, Helen D. Brasch, Paul F. Davis and Swee T. Tan

Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2016;69:742-744

http://jcp.bmj.com/content/69/8/742.full?sid=0b72c4ed-b6af-4a90-83bf-b8a3263fc86a

Cancers of the mouth are the sixth most common type of cancer. Among these cancers those affecting the tongue is the most common. The main therapies for treating these are surgery and radiotherapy. The chance of survival following conventional treatments is only 50%, which has remained unchanged for more than 40 years.

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Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

Authors: Tinte Itinteang, Jonathan C. Dunne, Alice M. Chibnall, Helen D. Brasch, Paul F. Davis and Swee T. Tan

 Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2016;69:942-945

http://jcp.bmj.com/content/69/8/742.full?sid=0b72c4ed-b6af-4a90-83bf-b8a3263fc86a

Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common cancer of the mouth. In a previous publication we identified two distinct subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) within tongue cancers, distributed within different areas of the tumour.

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Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Buccal Mucosal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Authors: Helen H. Yu, Therese Featherston, Swee T. Tan, Alice M. Chibnall, Helen D. Brasch, Paul F. Davis and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Front Surg 2016;3:46

http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00046

Cancers in the mouth are the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with over 90% being squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCCs affect the tongue, the floor of the mouth, the inner cheek region, the hard palate and the jaw.

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Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Buccal Mucosal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

Authors: Therese Featherston, Helen H. Yu, Jonathan C. Dunne, Alice M. Chibnall, Helen D. Brasch, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, Front Surg 2016; 3:52

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2016.00052

Cancer of the mouth is the sixth most common cancer world-wide. Those that affect the inside of the cheek (known as buccal mucosal squamous cell carcinoma, BMSCC) are particularly aggressive.

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