Health Minister visits GMRI facilities

Coleman

The GMRI’s newly appointed Chief Scientific Officer, Dr Tinte Itinteang, discusses the Institute’s research programme with the Minister of Health, The Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman

 

The Minister of Health, The Hon Dr Jonathan Coleman, visited the GMRI premises in Newtown, Wellington, in late March at the invitation of the Founder and Executive Director, Dr Swee Tan.

“We were pleased to have an opportunity to brief the Minister on our aspirations and our discoveries to date,” Dr Tan said.

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New GMRI website now up and running

We invite you all to visit the GMRI’s new website.

The GMRI has developed a new website to better showcase its ground-breaking research and to engage on a more personal level with supporters who want to stay abreast of progress.

Chair, Paul Baines, says the website better positions the GMRI’s research focus and tells more of the story behind the Institute’s approach to research into cancer, fibrotic conditions, vascular birthmarks and regenerative medicine, based on the role of stem cells.

“Swee and his team at the GMRI are doing some remarkable work based on concepts that international experts consider to be ground-breaking.

“It’s important that our supporters feel they can engage with what the GMRI is doing, can stay abreast of developments and feel part of the journey.”

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Rotary clubs get behind the GMRI

Pat Waite

The past Governor of Rotary District 9940 and GMRI supporter, Pat Waite

Rotary clubs in New Zealand and Australia are being urged to actively support the GMRI.

GMRI Founder and Executive Director, Dr Swee Tan, has a long association with Rotary in New Zealand.

In addition to his work with the GMRI, Swee has provided surgical services for free to the Rotary Overseas Medical Aid Corps (ROMAC).

He was made a Rotary Paul Harris Fellow in 2008 and was the keynote speaker at the 2014 Rotary International Institute conference in Wellington.

The past Governor of District 9940 and the organiser of that conference, Pat Waite, says Swee’s keynote presentation was rated the best by conference delegates.

“Over 80 percent of those surveyed noted Swee’s presentation exceeded expectations, a remarkable result,” Pat says.

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The other side of nursing at the GMRI

Left, 10-week old Stevie Phillips-Paki with a large strawberry birthmark that also affected her eye-socket, threatening her vision. Right, Sophie de Jong with Stevie after treatment, underscored by discoveries made by the team at the GMRI

Left, 10-week old Stevie Phillips-Paki with a large strawberry birthmark that also affected her eye-socket, threatening her vision. Right, Sophie de Jong with Stevie after treatment, underscored by discoveries made by the team at the GMRI

Not many people can say they are involved in changing the way cancer is treated – so Sophie de Jong considers herself lucky to be part of that process.

Sophie, a Research Nurse, works at the GMRI, experiencing what she considers to be the “other side” of the profession.

“It’s an interesting challenge, being on the other side and dealing with science and research, rather than dealing directly with patients in a hospital,” Sophie says.

“It’s also extremely exciting, being involved with such ground-breaking work.”

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Board member inspired by the GMRI’s work

Jane Parker

GMRI board member, Jane Parker

“The GMRI has an absolutely inspiring story to tell, and I’m privileged to be part of it,” says Jane Parker, a GMRI board member and passionate advocate.

Jane is a lawyer at Minter Ellison Rudd Watts, specialising in commercial law and projects with a focus on technology, contracting, intellectual property and governance.

Having done some pro bono work for the GMRI in the past, she was asked to join the board after another lawyer left.

Jane was “delighted” when Swee Tan asked if she was interested in filling the position.

“It was a great moment for me, personally and professionally,” she says.

“After my previous involvement with the Institute, I was very happy to join as it fits my personal values. Their goal is to reduce people’s suffering – how do you fault that?

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