New cancer treatment for glioblastoma — a devastating brain cancer

A new cancer treatment developed by the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute is being trialled for glioblastoma, a devastating brain cancer, which could revolutionise how the cancer is treated.

If proven effective, the cancer could be treated at home — without chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery. Patients would instead take commonly used, inexpensive medications. The treatment would cost a fraction of current treatments.

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Mentoring the next generation of scientists

Dr Itinteang with our recent summer students. Left to right: Sabrina Koh, Hugo Humphries, Therese Featherston, Dr Tinte Itinteang, Claudia Paterson, Shanella Nallaiah, Min Yi Lee.

Running a laboratory isn’t just about pioneering new research. It’s also an opportunity to foster the talents and enthusiasm of future scientists.

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Helping us fight cancer, one donation at a time

You’ve probably heard that it takes a village to raise a child. But did you know that it takes a community to run a lab? The generosity and hard work of a huge range of donors and fundraisers helps to keep the GMRI staffed, stocked, and functioning year round. We’re grateful for every contribution we receive — no amount is too small to make a difference.

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Many invitations to present internationally — demonstrating the significance and breadth of the GMRI’s work

Having 13 abstracts accepted for an Australasian conference is testimony to the GMRI’s research community, says Chief Scientific Officer Dr Tinte Itinteang. It highlights the significance and breadth of the GMRI’s work.

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International recognition for cancer research

The green specks are cancer stem cells in glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer.

The research team at the Gillies McIndoe Research Insitute has been invited to write an editorial on a cancer research paper by scientists from Canada and United Kingdom, which appeared in the prestigious journal Nature.

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Learning to re-programme stem cells at the Salk Institute

Erin Paterson and Dr Swee Tan at the Plimmerton Rotary Club.

Stem cells differ from other kinds of cells. Unlike muscle cells, blood cells, or nerve cells, for example, stem cells can divide and renew themselves.

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