GMRI and CCDHB to jointly host public lecture by distinguished neurosurgeon and neuroscientist

Professor Andrew H Kaye is the Head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Melbourne. He is a neurosurgeon, and was Director of the Department of Neurosurgery at The Royal Melbourne Hospital 1992-2017. He graduated from The University of Melbourne in 1973, and subsequently trained in Neurosurgery at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and The Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne. He undertook further neurosurgery training in Oxford, London and at The Cleveland Clinic. On returning to Australia in 1983 he was appointed Neurosurgeon at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, and commenced research into neuro-oncology at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. He was appointed Professor of Neurosurgery at The University of Melbourne in 1992, and the James Stewart Professor of Surgery and Head of the Department of Surgery at The University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital in 1997.

Prof Kaye’s lecture will be held at:
5.00 pm Thursday 13 September
Rutherford House Lecture Theatre 2 (RHLT2)
Pipitea Campus, Victoria University of Wellington, Bunny Street, Wellington

The lecture is open to the public. Seats are limited so if you would like to attend please click here.

Expression and Localization of Cathepsin B, D, and G in Dupuytren’s Disease

Authors: Kirin Tan, Helen D. Brasch, Bede van Schaijik, James R. Armstrong, Reginald W. Marsh, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

 

Plastic Reconstructive Surgery Global Open 2018. Volume 6,

doi:10.1097/GOX.0000000000001686

https://journals.lww.com/prsgo/Fulltext/2018/02000/Expression_and_Localization_of_Cathepsins_B,_D,.9.aspx

 

Dupuytren’s disease is a slowly developing condition involving the palm of the hand. Knots of tissue (nodules) form, which eventually grow into cords that pull one or more fingers into a bent position. These affected fingers cannot be straightened, restricting a person performing a number of activities.

 

The current management of the disease involves either injections of steroids or collagenase or surgery but, nonetheless, recurrence is up to 70%.  While the cause of the condition is uncertain, we have identified embryo stem cell-like cells in it. These cells have been shown to express constituents of the renin-angiotensin system. Our findings suggest that these stem cells might give rise to the condition and that regulating the renin-angiotensin system may have a role in its treatment.

 

The production of the angiotensin II component of the renin-angiotensin system may be promoted by the proteases cathepsins B, D and G. This paper establishes the presence of these three proteases in Dupuytren’s disease tissues and demonstrates that the B and D forms are localised to the stem cells which are known to express the renin-angiotensin system.

 

New cancer treatment for glioblastoma — a devastating brain cancer

A new cancer treatment developed by the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute is being trialled for glioblastoma, a devastating brain cancer, which could revolutionise how the cancer is treated.

If proven effective, the cancer could be treated at home — without chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery. Patients would instead take commonly used, inexpensive medications. The treatment would cost a fraction of current treatments.

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Mentoring the next generation of scientists

Dr Itinteang with our recent summer students. Left to right: Sabrina Koh, Hugo Humphries, Therese Featherston, Dr Tinte Itinteang, Claudia Paterson, Shanella Nallaiah, Min Yi Lee.

Running a laboratory isn’t just about pioneering new research. It’s also an opportunity to foster the talents and enthusiasm of future scientists.

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Helping us fight cancer, one donation at a time

You’ve probably heard that it takes a village to raise a child. But did you know that it takes a community to run a lab? The generosity and hard work of a huge range of donors and fundraisers helps to keep the GMRI staffed, stocked, and functioning year round. We’re grateful for every contribution we receive — no amount is too small to make a difference.

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Many invitations to present internationally — demonstrating the significance and breadth of the GMRI’s work

Having 13 abstracts accepted for an Australasian conference is testimony to the GMRI’s research community, says Chief Scientific Officer Dr Tinte Itinteang. It highlights the significance and breadth of the GMRI’s work.

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International recognition for cancer research

The green specks are cancer stem cells in glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer.

The research team at the Gillies McIndoe Research Insitute has been invited to write an editorial on a cancer research paper by scientists from Canada and United Kingdom, which appeared in the prestigious journal Nature.

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Learning to re-programme stem cells at the Salk Institute

Erin Paterson and Dr Swee Tan at the Plimmerton Rotary Club.

Stem cells differ from other kinds of cells. Unlike muscle cells, blood cells, or nerve cells, for example, stem cells can divide and renew themselves.

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Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Colon Adenocarcinoma Metastasis to the Liver

Authors: Hugo N. Humphries, Susrutha K. Wickremesekera, Reginald W. Marsh, Helen D. Brasch, Shreeja Mehrotra, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery 2018. Volume 4

doi:10.3389 /fsurg.2017.00076

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsurg.2017.00076

Worldwide, colon cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths. In New Zealand it is ranked second. A range of environmental, lifestyle and genetic factors has been attributed to its progression. Approximately 50% of patients with colon cancer develop secondary tumours in the liver and this accounts for two-thirds of the disease-related deaths.

Cancer stem cell populations have now been identified and characterised in liver tumours. This paper confirms that the concept of the presence and function of stem cells established by the GMRI in a number of other cancers is also present in this tumour.

Rob Cameron

Rob Cameron, a great New Zealander with a long list of accomplishments, a friend of many and a wonderful supporter of the GMRI, passed away recently. He made an outstanding contribution to our development over recent years and provided invaluable advice and support on a range of matters.

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