Expression of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Wildtype Glioblastoma

Authors: Sabrina P. Koh, Agadha C. Wickremesekera, Helen D. Brasch, Reginald Marsh, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery, May 2017. Vol.4. doi:10.3389/surg.2017.00028

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2017.00028/full

The GMRI has demonstrated the presence of cancer stem cells – considered to be the origin of cancer – in many different types of cancers including glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer. We have also shown that the cancer stem cells in glioblastoma possess the constituents of the renin-angiotensin system.

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Cancer Stem Cells in Moderately Differentiated Lip Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Express Components of the Renin-Angiotensin System

Authors: Rachna S. Ram, Helen D. Brasch, Jonathan C. Dunne, Paul F. Davis, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery – Otorhinolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery June 2017. Vol.4: doi:10.3389 /fsurg. 2017.00030

http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fsurg.2017.00030/full

Earlier research undertaken by the team at the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute has identified and characterised cancer stem cells in tongue cancer, buccal mucosal (inner cheek) cancer, and lip cancer. The team has also shown that cancer stem cells in tongue cancer and buccal mucosal cancer express the renin-angiotensin system.

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GMRI scientists give keynote addresses at the 10th International Conference on Cancer Stem Cells and Oncology Research

Executive Director Dr Swee Tan and Chief Scientific Officer Dr Tinte Itinteang recently returned from London where they delivered two keynote addresses at the 10th International Conference on Cancer Stem Cells and Oncology Research.

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GMRI to host lecture by top Australian plastic surgeon and stem cell researcher

Professor Wayne Morrison

The GMRI is pleased to announce that Australian Professor Wayne Morrison will be giving a public lecture in Wellington as part of the GMRI Eminent Speakers’ Programme.

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College students raise funds for glioblastoma research

From left: Dr Tinte Itinteang, Olivia Watson, Phoebe Ellis, Dr Agadha Wickremesekera, Dr Paul Davis

Staff at the GMRI received a special visit this month from Queen Margaret College student Phoebe Ellis, who has raised close to $1000 towards the GMRI’s glioblastoma (GB) research programme.

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GMRI scientists lead the way in solving crippling hand disease

Sabrina Koh,
Deane Endowment Trust
sponsored summer student

People suffering from Dupuytren’s disease could ultimately regain the function of their hands and quality of life, thanks to the international award winning work of the GMRI.

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Sir Harold Gillies’s pioneering work recognised as part of Passchendaele commemorations

Sir Harold Gillies

The pioneering work of Sir Harold Gillies, whom the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute is co-named after, has been recognised by the UK’s Daily Mail as part of the commemorations of the battle of Passchendaele.

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GMRI joins social media

The GMRI is making improvements in how we communicate with our friends and supporters, by joining Facebook and Twitter.

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Recent publications in peer-reviewed journals

The GMRI’s research team is actively engaged in publishing articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

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GMRI scientists lead the way in solving crippling hand disease

Sabrina Koh, Deane Endowment Trust sponsored summer student

People suffering from Dupuytren’s disease could ultimately regain the function of their hands and quality of life, thanks to the international award winning work of the Gillies McIndoe Research Institute (GMRI).

Dr Swee Tan, Executive Director of the GMRI today congratulated 20-year-old Deane Endowment Trust sponsored summer student Sabrina Koh, for winning the 2017 International Dupuytren Award. Her research has also been published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Global Open, the most prestigious plastic surgery journal in the world.

“Dupuytren’s disease causes one or more fingers to curl into the palm due to the contracting and toughening of connective tissue. While surgery is commonly used to remove the contracted tissue, it involves prolonged periods of rehabilitation and readily recurs in some patients. In extreme cases it may necessitate amputation,” said Dr Tan.

Dupuytren’s disease

While this disease is still poorly understood and treated, it affects millions of people worldwide, particularly those of Northern European descent. High profile sufferers include Bill Nighy who recently spoke about his condition on Radio New Zealand’s Saturday Morning programme.

Ms Koh’s project was based on the novel approach of focusing on the stem cell origin of Dupuytren’s disease, closely mirroring research that the GMRI is undertaking into the origins of cancer.

“Our recent research has shown that cancer stem cells are the potential origin of cancer. We believe that a combination of existing, affordable medications commonly used for other conditions can be repurposed, and used to manipulate the key pathways that control cancer stem cells and, ultimately, the progression of cancer.”

“Our objective is to create a low-cost and widely available treatment for cancer,” Dr Tan said. 

This approach has already proven successful in a small series of patients and a full clinical study is planned for later this year, subject to funding.

Dr Tan acknowledged Sir Roderick Deane and Lady Gillian Deane for their ongoing generous support of the GMRI’s summer student programme that made the Dupuytren’s disease research possible.

Ms Koh’s research was supervised by GMRI Chief Scientific Officer Dr Tinte Itinteang, and the team included plastic and hand surgeon Dr Jim Armstrong, Dr Tan, Dr Paul Davis, Dr Helen Brasch, and summer student Nicholas On.

ENDS

For media enquires please contact Peter Fitzjohn on 027 740 9281

For more information and images of Dupuytren’s disease

Access the full research paper Embryonic Stem Cell–like Population in Dupuytren’s Disease

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