Helping us fight cancer, one donation at a time

You’ve probably heard that it takes a village to raise a child. But did you know that it takes a community to run a lab? The generosity and hard work of a huge range of donors and fundraisers helps to keep the GMRI staffed, stocked, and functioning year round. We’re grateful for every contribution we receive — no amount is too small to make a difference.

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Many invitations to present internationally — demonstrating the significance and breadth of the GMRI’s work

Having 13 abstracts accepted for an Australasian conference is testimony to the GMRI’s research community, says Chief Scientific Officer Dr Tinte Itinteang. It highlights the significance and breadth of the GMRI’s work.

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International recognition for cancer research

The green specks are cancer stem cells in glioblastoma, an aggressive form of brain cancer.

The research team at the Gillies McIndoe Research Insitute has been invited to write an editorial on a cancer research paper by scientists from Canada and United Kingdom, which appeared in the prestigious journal Nature.

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Learning to re-programme stem cells at the Salk Institute

Erin Paterson and Dr Swee Tan at the Plimmerton Rotary Club.

Stem cells differ from other kinds of cells. Unlike muscle cells, blood cells, or nerve cells, for example, stem cells can divide and renew themselves.

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Characterization of Cancer Stem Cells in Colon Adenocarcinoma Metastasis to the Liver

Authors: Hugo N. Humphries, Susrutha K. Wickremesekera, Reginald W. Marsh, Helen D. Brasch, Shreeja Mehrotra, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Frontiers in Surgery 2018. Volume 4

doi:10.3389 /fsurg.2017.00076

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fsurg.2017.00076

Worldwide, colon cancer is the third most common cause of cancer deaths. In New Zealand it is ranked second. A range of environmental, lifestyle and genetic factors has been attributed to its progression. Approximately 50% of patients with colon cancer develop secondary tumours in the liver and this accounts for two-thirds of the disease-related deaths.

Cancer stem cell populations have now been identified and characterised in liver tumours. This paper confirms that the concept of the presence and function of stem cells established by the GMRI in a number of other cancers is also present in this tumour.

Rob Cameron

Rob Cameron, a great New Zealander with a long list of accomplishments, a friend of many and a wonderful supporter of the GMRI, passed away recently. He made an outstanding contribution to our development over recent years and provided invaluable advice and support on a range of matters.

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Subcellular Localization of the Stem Cell Markers OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, KLF4 and c-MYC in Cancer: A Review

Authors: Bede van Schaijik, Paul F. Davis, Agadha C. Wickremesekera, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Journal of Clinical Pathology 2018. Volume 71, 88-91
doi:10.1136/j.jclinpath-2017-204815
http://jcp.bmj.com/content/71/1/88

The cancer stem cell (CSC) concept of cancer proposes that not all cancer cells participate in tumour formation and that the development and progression of cancer is driven by CSCs, a small sub-population of cells. A number of molecules specific to stem cells have been identified.

This review summarises the current understanding of the localisation and function of these molecules in relation to the role of cancer stem cells for a number of types of cancer. These findings give clues relating to their roles in cancer development and growth. They are found both inside and outside the nuclei of cells, which suggest that their movement in the cells may determine their functional activities with regards to tumour proliferation.

GMRI and HVDHB to jointly host public lecture by leading plastic and craniofacial surgeon and medical humanitarian

Dr Mark Moore

Dr Moore is a plastic and craniofacial surgeon and medical humanitarian. He is the Head of the Australian Craniofacial Unit in Adelaide, Australia, where he has spent the last 30 years of his career after completing his plastic surgical training in New Zealand. During this time he has been actively involved in multidisciplinary clinical management, teaching and research into a wide array of major cleft and craniofacial anomalies.
He has participated in the development of craniofacial surgical services within the South East Asian region through an involvement in outreach clinics and teaching.

Over the last 18 years Dr Moore has had a major commitment to the provision and development of cleft lip and palate and reconstructive plastic surgical services in the eastern Indonesian provinces and Timor-Leste, for which he was recognised by being awarded a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) by the Australian Government, as well as the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons International Medal. In the last three years he has also contributed to similar surgical service provision in Bhutan, working with Interplast.

Dr Moore’s lecture will be held at:
5.00 pm Thursday 8 March
James Coe Centre, Dowse Art Museum
45 Laings Road, Lower Hutt

The lecture is open to the public. Seats are limited so if you would like to attend please click here.

Tumour Stem Cells in Meningioma: A Review

Authors: Ganeshwaran Shivapathasundram, Agadha C. Wickremesekera, Swee T. Tan and Tinte Itinteang

Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 2018. Volume 47, 66-71 doi:10.1016/j.jocn.2017.10.059

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/320859474_Tumour_stem_cells_in_meningioma_A_review

Meningiomas are cancers that occur in the brain and spinal cord. They comprise about 25% of all neurological cancers. Their incidence is around 6 per 100,000 with a slightly higher preponderance in females. While the majority of these cancers are benign, they have a high rate of recurrence especially when the location is at the base of the skull.

The presence of stem cells in meningioma was first reported in 2009 in an aggressive malignant form. This review discusses the identification of a number of stem cell marker proteins in this tumour so as to establish a possible hierarchy of them. However it is apparent that there is relatively little known at this stage about the properties and functions of these cells in meningiomas and that further studies are needed.

Top plastic surgeon and stem cell researcher calls GMRI cancer research “extraordinary”

Dr Swee Tan, Professor Wayne Morrison, Mayor Justin Lester, Chair Paul Baines

In August the GMRI was honoured to host top plastic surgeon and stem cell researcher, Professor Wayne Morrison, as part of the GMRI Eminent Speakers’ Programme.

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